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Are Croissants Healthy or Unhealthy?

By Micaella Jorge, Ph.D.

Most of us can agree that the buttery taste of a croissant that flakes off in your mouth is heavenly. You might also be wondering if that delicious croissant is healthy for you and if it can fit into your lifestyle. This article will look at the nutritional value of croissants and whether they are considered healthy.

What’s in a croissant? Is a croissant unhealthy?

Croissants are flaky pastries that are typically made with butter, flour, sugar, eggs, salt, water, yeast, and milk. There are also varieties that contain sweet or savory fillings, such as chocolate or cheese. The nutritional value of a croissant varies based on the type, but these buttery pastries are typically high in calories, fat, and carbohydrates. While this does not make croissants healthy, croissants can still be a part of a balanced meal by combining them with fruit, vegetables, nut butter, or eggs.

Are croissants high in fat?

The large amount of butter used in croissants does make croissants high in saturated fat, with typically-sized butter croissants containing 8 to 12 grams of saturated fat. The high fat content in croissants is due to lamination. Lamination requires a certain amount of fat in order to succeed and is what creates those thin and flaky layers that make up a croissant.

Are croissants healthy for weight loss? Can you eat croissants while on a diet?

When focused on weight loss goals, it is important to keep in mind calories consumed versus calories burned. Croissants can contain between 200 to 500 calories per croissant. This means that when eaten in moderation, yes you can eat croissants even if you are on a diet and are focused on weight loss. By reviewing nutritional information (calories, fat, carbs) and choosing a type of croissant that matches your preferences, you can incorporate croissants into your diet plan so that it fits your lifestyle and goals.

Are croissants bad for cholesterol?

If you’re watching your cholesterol levels, you generally want to stay away from foods high in saturated fats. Consuming too much saturated fat can raise low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol levels in the blood. Croissants can raise these LDL cholesterol levels due to their high amount of butter, and therefore, saturated fat found in croissants.

Are croissants healthier than bread? Are croissants more fattening than bread?

Bread tends to be a healthier option when compared to croissants, considering the ingredients used in each. The high butter content in croissants means they have a higher fat content when compared to bread. Bread is also generally lower in calories and carbs, per serving. Additionally, bread can be richer in minerals and nutrients than croissants. However, it is important to note that specific nutritional value will vary depending on the type of bread and croissant being compared.

Is it bad to eat croissants every day?

It isn’t necessarily bad to eat a croissant every day. While croissants cannot offer all essential nutrients, you can up the health value by adding other nutritious foods to your croissant such as fresh fruit or veggies. If you’re concerned about weight loss or overall health goals, you can also opt for smaller croissants or cut a medium-sized croissant in half to enjoy the deliciousness of this pastry while staying on track with your health goals.

Is a croissant a healthy breakfast?

A croissant on its own won’t make for a healthy breakfast. This is because croissants aren’t considered a nutrient-rich food. However, if eaten in combination with other foods that have more nutritional value, croissants can be incorporated in a healthy and balanced breakfast meal.

Where can I buy the best croissants online?

At Wildgrain, we specialize in making high-quality, fresh breads that are delivered directly to your door. Wildgrain is the first bake-from-frozen delivery subscription service for breads, rolls, pastries, and fresh pastas. Some of our popular pastries include chocolate croissants and traditional croissants. Learn more about Wildgrain and our artisanal baking and cooking methods.

 

About the Author

Dr. Micaella Jorge has been conducting public health research for over five years. She received her Bachelor’s in Chemistry from the University of San Diego and her Ph.D. in Chemistry from Vanderbilt University. She presently works as a medical writer and loves being able to assist others in understanding various health and scientific topics.

 

This content is for informational use only and does not replace professional nutrition and/or medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. It is not a substitute for and should not be relied upon for specific nutrition and/or medical recommendations. Please talk with your doctor about any questions or concerns.
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